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CU Denver

Get in Touch
CU Building, 1st Floor, 1250 14th Street, Denver, CO 80202
inworks@ucdenver.edu
303-315-0047
Lab Hours

CU Anschutz

Get in Touch
CU Health Sciences Library, 2nd Floor, 12950 E Montview Blvd, Aurora, CO 80045
inworks@ucdenver.edu
303-724-4120
Lab Hours
  • Mon - Fri: 10a-3p
  • Sat - Sun: By Appointment

Spring 2019 Courses

IWKS 2100/5100

Human-Centered Design, Innovation and Prototyping

Introduces collaborative interdisciplinary design and innovation from a human perspective. Using the wide array of Inworks prototyping facilities, teams of students will design and implement human-oriented projects of increasing scale and complexity, in the process acquiring essential innovation and problem-solving skills. No previous design or prototyping experience is expected or required!

Suggested Background: None
Credit hours: 3
Cross-listed with: ARCH 3705, FINE 2105
Schedule:

  • T/Th 2:00 – 3:15 PM
  • Th 5:00 – 7:50 PM

IWKS 2300/5350

Computational Foundations of Innovation

Provides a broad introduction to the technological underpinnings of modern society, introducing the fundamental principles and algorithms underlying computer programming. Students will create generative visualizations, work with data, and create realistic artifacts with interesting behavior using Processing and Arduino, with optional opportunities to script chatbots and work with lab equipment to create hybrid digital/physical objects. In-class and in-world discussions and readings introduce important computer science ideas and concepts. Emergent topics in computer science will also be introduced. Completion of this course will prepare students for more advanced IWKS courses that require knowledge of computing principles and programming.

Suggested Background: None
Credit hours: 3
Schedule: M/W 2:00 – 3:15 PM

IWKS 3100/5170

3D Design and Prototyping

Introduces the design and computer-controlled fabrication of three dimensional objects using both additive (3D printing) and subtractive (laser cutter, CNC router / milling machine) processes. Various commercial and open-source software tools for 3D design (CAD), manufacturing (CAM) and visualization will be explored. Increasingly complex projects throughout the semester will be used to illustrate fabrication techniques. The course will culminate in a final project.

Suggested Background: None
Credit hours: 3
Schedule: M 3:30 – 6:20PM

IWKS 3180/5180

Choose Your Own Adventure: Experiences in Design, Innovation and Prototyping

Experiences in Design, Innovation and Prototyping provides weekly workshops, speakers, and other experiences that educate and enrich across the design, innovation and prototyping landscape. Students may choose to participate in any five (for one credit), ten (for two credits) or fifteen (for three credits) activities. Each week, participating students will attend the scheduled activity, and then create a meaningful response that reflects the impact of that activity on their thinking or practice.

Suggested Background: None
Credit hours: 1-3 (Variable)
Schedule: Th 3:30 AM – 6:20 PM

IWKS 3300/5300

NAND to Tetris Foundations of Computer Systems

Introduces the principles and technologies that underlie the global information age. Starting from first principles, students gradually construct a fully functional simulated hardware platform, together with a modern software hierarchy, yielding a working basic yet powerful computer system. In the process of building this computer system, students gain a first-hand understanding of how hardware and software systems are designed and how they work together as one enterprise. The course involves considerable software development in the form of a series of laboratory assignments of increasing complexity, but requires only introductory programming experience.

Suggested Background: IWKS 2300 or similar computing experience
Credit hours: 3
Schedule: T/Th 9:30 – 10:45 AM

IWKS 3400/5400

Game Design and Development I Principles of Computer Game Development

Introduces the fundamental principles of computer game development, including the rich interplay of computer science, graphics design, physics, music, and narrative that comprise modern computer games. Students develop interactive 2D and simple 3D games in laboratory assignments of increasing complexity. The course involves considerable software development, but requires only introductory programming experience (e.g., IWKS 2300). Culminates with a final project consisting of a team-developed complete game.

Suggested Background: IWKS 2300 or similar computing experience
Credit hours: 3
Schedule: M/W 11:30 AM – 12:15 PM

IWKS 3850/5850

Product Design

Explores the design requirements associated with creating a product that will be manufactured in large quantities and used by potentially thousands of users. These requirements are often very different from those associated with creating a working prototype. This gap between prototype creation and starting a business offers an interesting and unique set of design challenges. As part of the course, teams of students will engage in a realistic product design cycle.

Suggested Background: IWKS 2100 
Credit hours: 3
Schedule: F 9:30 AM – 12:30 PM

IWKS 4120/5120

The Internet of Things [IoT]

Introduces techniques for (1) designing cyber-physical systems that can sense and respond to humans in meaningful ways, (2) creating networks of physical objects that collect and exchange data, and (3) for creating autonomous artifacts. Examples of such systems include interactive art, wearable health monitors and game playing robots. Working individually and in teams, students develop projects using Inworks’ materials, devices and fabrication tools, culminating with a final project of the students’ choosing. The course involves considerable prototyping and software development, but requires only introductory programming and prototyping experience.

Suggested Background: IWKS 2300 or similar computing experience 
Credit hours: 3
Schedule: M/W 9:30 – 10:45 AM

IWKS 4500/5500

Bio Design and Innovation

Introduces the biodesign innovation process, which involves identifying important human needs and inventing meaningful solutions to address them. The course examines how biotechnology and bio-inspired innovation improve the form and function of our design world through innovative materials and novel approaches to developing buildings, food, medicine, infrastructure and more. Readings and in-class debates will raise critical issues in contemporary bioethics. For their final projects, students will choose to create and prototype a speculative biodesign concept, or work in the bio lab on the development of a real-world biodesign solution of their choosing.

Suggested Background: IWKS 2100 and/or IWKS 3540
Credit hours: 3
Schedule: W 3:30 – 6:20 PM

IWKS 4800/5800

StartUp: Creating a New Venture from Scratch

Explores the entire entrepreneurial cycle, from inspiration to IPO. Student teams create and launch an innovative company in a semester. Culminates in a “pitchfest” to area entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. One of two alternative capstone courses for the Inworks Minor in Design and Innovation.

Suggested Background: Enrollment in the Inworks HCDI minor or certificate, or instructor permission; Completion of at least three other Inworks courses recommended.
Credit hours: 4
Schedule: T 3:30 – 6:20 PM

Don’t see exactly what you’re looking for? Check our full course list!

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