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Spring 2020 Courses

IWKS 2100

Intro to Human-Centered Design, Innovation and Prototyping

Introduces students to a design methodology known as human-centered design, which can be harnessed to stimulate innovation in various career fields and industries. Through in-class activities and learning an array of prototyping tools in the Inworks lab, students will build up the skills necessary to develop their own projects in the second half of the course. Team projects apply the design process and culminate in a product, service, or system that is designed from scratch. All students from any major are welcome to take this course.

Suggested Background: None
Credit hours: 3
Cross-listed with: ARCH 3705
Schedule: Tues/Thurs 12:30 – 1:45 pm or Tues/Thurs 2:00 – 3:15 pm

IWKS 5100 (Graduate Level of IWKS 2100)

(Graduate) Intro to Human-Centered Design, Innovation and Prototyping

Introduces students to a design methodology known as human-centered design, which can be harnessed to stimulate innovation in various career fields and industries. Through in-class activities and learning an array of prototyping tools in the Inworks lab, students will build up the skills necessary to develop their own projects in the second half of the course. Team projects apply the design process and culminate in a product, service, or system that is designed from scratch.

Suggested Background: None
Credit hours: 3
Schedule: Tues/Thurs 12:30 – 1:45 pm

IWKS 2300

Computational Foundations of Innovation

Provides a broad introduction to the technological underpinnings of modern society, introducing the fundamental principles and algorithms underlying computer programming. Students will create generative visualizations, work with data, and create realistic artifacts with interesting behavior using Processing and Arduino, with optional opportunities to script chatbots and work with lab equipment to create hybrid digital/physical objects. In-class and in-world discussions and readings introduce important computer science ideas and concepts. Emergent topics in computer science will also be introduced. Completion of this course will prepare students for more advanced IWKS courses that require knowledge of computing principles and programming.

Suggested Background: None
Credit hours: 3
Schedule: Tues/Thurs 9:30 – 10:45 am

IWKS 3100/5170

3D Design and Prototyping

Introduces the design and computer-controlled fabrication of three dimensional objects using both additive (3D printing) and subtractive (laser cutter, CNC router / milling machine) processes. Various commercial and open-source software tools for 3D design (CAD), manufacturing (CAM) and visualization will be explored. Increasingly complex projects throughout the semester will be used to illustrate fabrication techniques. The course will culminate in a final project.

Suggested Background: None
Credit hours: 3
Cross-listed with: ARCH 3706
Schedule: Wed 3:30 – 6:20 pm

IWKS 3400/5400

Game Design and Development I - Principles of Computer Game Development

Introduces the fundamental principles of computer game development, including the rich interplay of computer science, graphics design, physics, music, and narrative that comprise modern computer games. Students develop interactive 2D and simple 3D games in laboratory assignments of increasing complexity. The course involves considerable software development, but requires only introductory programming experience (e.g., IWKS 2300). Culminates with a final project consisting of a team-developed complete game.

Suggested Background: IWKS 2300 or similar computing experience
Credit hours: 3
Cross-listed with: CSCI 2941
Schedule: Wed 9:30 – 12:20 pm

IWKS 3540/5540

Synthetic Biology for Innovators

Introduces the fundamentals of synthetic biology for those who seek to use it as tool for innovation. Synthetic biology allows us to engineer new biological systems and redesign existing biological components by integrating aspects of biotechnology, evolutionary and molecular biology, systems biology, computer engineering, computational biology, and genetic engineering. Advancement in technological tools and techniques make this material accessible to motivated individuals from many disciplines, and no biology background is required. Culminates with a final team project focused on designing synthetic biology solutions that address human need.

Suggested Background: None. No previous background in biology required.
Credit hours: 3
Schedule: Lecture: Mon 3:30 – 4:45 pm
Recitation: Mon 5:00 – 6:15 pm OR Wed 3:30 – 4:45 pm

IWKS 3850/5850

Product Design

Explores the design requirements associated with creating a product that will be manufactured in large quantities and used by potentially thousands of users. These requirements are often very different from those associated with creating a working prototype. This gap between prototype creation and starting a business offers an interesting and unique set of design challenges. As part of the course, teams of students will engage in a realistic product design cycle.

Suggested Background: IWKS 2100
Credit hours: 3
Schedule: Mon/Wed 8:00 – 9:15 am

IWKS 4120/5120

IoT: The Internet of Things

In a world where everything is connected to everything else, how does that work? This course introduces techniques for (1) designing systems that can sense the environment and respond to humans in meaningful ways and (2) creating networks of physical objects that collect and exchange data. Such systems might include wearable sensors, interactive art, and Internet-connected home devices. Working individually and in teams, students will develop projects using Inworks’ materials, devices, and fabrication tools. The course involves considerable prototyping and software development but requires only introductory programming and prototyping experience.

Suggested Background: IWKS 2300 or similar computing experience
Credit hours: 3
Cross-listed with: CSCI 2942
Schedule: Mon/Wed 2:00 – 3:15 pm 

IWKS 4930/5930

Special Topics: Introduction to Research Tools for Designers & Entrepreneurs

Designers, entrepreneurs, and business decision makers are all frequently faced with the complex task of trying to select the best path from an unlimited array of options. Should we include feature A or feature B? Target market X or market Y? Discontinue or expand a product line? In order to make informed choices, decision makers need to conduct the appropriate research at the appropriate time–often with limited resources.
Through readings, lectures, and hands-on exercises, this course will help students build their own low-budget toolkit of qualitative and quantitative research methods. They will also gain a better understanding of the role research plays in developing products and services from initial ideation through feature selection, launch, and post launch analysis. Throughout the course students will gain firsthand experience applying the research tools presented to a design or business problem of their choosing.

Suggested Background: None
Credit hours: 1
Schedule: Tues 7:00 – 7:50 pm

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